A Decade to study deep-sea life. Nature Ecology and Evolution

Howell, K.L., Hilário, A., Allcock, A.L., Bailey, D., Baker, M., Le Bris, N., Clark, M.R., Colaço, A., Copley, J., Cordes, E., Danovaro, R., Dissanayake, A., Escobar, E., Esquete, P., Gallagher, A., Gates, A., Gaudron, S.M., German, C.R., Gjerde, K., Higgs, N.D., Levin, L.A., Manea, E., McClain, C., Menot, L., Mestre, N.C., Metaxas, A., Milligan, R., Muthumbi, A.W.N, Narayanaswamy, B., Ramalho, S.P., Ramirez-Llodra, E., Robson, L., Rogers, A.D., Sellanes, J., Sigwart, J., Sink, K., Snelgrove, P.V.R., Stefanoudis, P., Sumida, P.Y., Taylor, M., Thurber, A.R., Vieira, R., Watanabe, H.K., Woodall, L., Xavier, J.R.

The health of the global ocean, on which society depends, is in decline. The importance of sustainable use to ocean health has long been recognized, yet the United Nations (UN) First World Ocean Assessment from 2017 highlighted increasing ocean pressures from accelerated expansion of human activities, including climate change. These pressures affect all ocean regions, from the coast to the deep sea. In response to this concern, and to align with several international policy commitments, the UN General Assembly proclaimed 2021–2030 the Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development.

5, 265–267

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-01352-5

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